Wine Recommendation
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Wine Recommendation

Casa Nuestra 2004 Two Goats Red

Casa Nuestra

2004 Two Goats Red
(Napa Valley)

There go owner Gene Kirkham and winemaker Allen Price again, having fun with us. This duo has been cutting up since the 1980s over there on the Silverado Trail near St. Helena, especially with their Two Goats Red, whose blend differs with each vintage. The small, rustic winery says of this wine, that it is “dedicated to the Weed Abatement staff.” You might have guessed that the so-called staff is a pair of Nubian goats named Nava and Cross, who clean up the property while filling their considerable bellies.

What we have then, is a fun wine that has substance and gives a whole lot of pleasure without emptying your wallet. The aromas are reminiscent of a berry patch – blackberry, blueberry and wild cherry – with some hints of cinnamon and a tinge of bittersweet chocolate. The wine is very well balanced with tar in the front and minerality on the finish. In the middle is a soft wine with supple tannins, which will help the wine age for a half-dozen years.

The blend spent 19 months in second- and third-year French barrels. The listed alcohol is 13.9 percent, and alas, there were just under 300 cases produced. You go goats! – baah, baah.

Reviewed September 26, 2006 by Alan Goldfarb.

Other reviewed wines from Casa Nuestra

Casa Nuestra
2004 Petite Sirah
(Solano County)
Catherine Fallis 12/12/2006

The Wine

Winery: Casa Nuestra
Vintage: 2004
Wine: Two Goats Red
Appellation: Napa Valley
Grapes: Cabernet Franc (40%), Merlot (40%), Petite Sirah (20%)
Price: 750ml $19.00

Review Date: 9/26/2006

The Reviewer

Alan Goldfarb

Alan Goldfarb has been writing about and reviewing wine for 17 years. His reviews have been published in the St. Helena Star, San Jose Mercury, San Francisco Examiner, Decanter, and Wine Enthusiast, among others. Not once has he used a point system, star system, or an iconic symbol to quantify a wine. What counts in Mr. Goldfarb’s criteria when judging a wine is: how it tastes in the glass; is it well-constructed; its food compatibility; and presence of redeeming regional attributes.